The National Benefits Hub

Research that Supports Recreation

← Home

Advanced Search

Leisure-time Physical Activity, Body Mass Index, and Risk of Dementia

Key Message

Maintaining high or increasing leisure-time physical activity after midlife was associated with lower dementia risk, benefits being more pronounced among men, overweight individuals. 

Source

Tolppanen, Anna-Maija et al. (2015). Leisure-time physical activity from mid- to late life, body mass index, and risk of dementia. Alzheimer's & Dementia. 11(4): 434–443.e6. doi:10.1016/j.jalz.2014.01.008

Purpose

We investigated the associations between leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) from mid- to late life, the risk of dementia, and the role of body mass index, sex, and APOE in the CAIDE study during 28-year follow-up. Cognitive function of a random subsample was assessed at a mean age of 78.8 years (n = 1511), and dementia/Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnoses were identified from national registers for the entire target population (n = 3559).

Evidence

Moderate (hazard ratio [HR], 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08–1.99) and low levels of midlife LTPA (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 0.99–1.95) were associated with higher risk of dementia in comparison with the most active category. The benefits were more pronounced among men, overweight individuals, and APOE ε4 noncarriers. Maintaining high LTPA (HR, 0.16; 95% CI, 0.06–0.41) or increasing LTPA (HR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.09–0.40) after midlife was associated with lower dementia risk. Similar results were observed for AD.

Benefit Statements / Outcomes

Leadership Provided By:

  • Leisure Information Network (LIN)
  • Alberta Recreation and Parks Association

On Behalf Of:

  • Canadian Parks and Recreation Association (CPRAA)

Get Updates By Email